• Extension Speakers: Quick Tips for Musicians Part 2

    5 comments / Posted by Bruce Ohms

    212 Extension Cabinet

    In the first part of this article we learned the basics of configuring extension speakers- as long as you know the total impedance load of your cabinet(s).

    So How Do You Calculate the Total Impedance Load?

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  • Extension Speakers: Quick Tips for Musicians Part 1

    5 comments / Posted by Bruce Ohms

    VX112 Extension Speaker

    No matter which speaker configuration you select, if you're playing in different venues chances are you'll eventually want to use different cabinets or an extension speaker. Perhaps you chose a combo amp for the convenience and portability, but your next performance will be on a wide stage where you might not be able to hear your amp from the other side. An additional cabinet on the other side of the stage could be a very nice solution (and your bandmates who play over there might appreciate being able to hear you without having to add you to their crucial monitor mix). At first glance, it seems simple enough, after all your amp does have an extension speaker jack, so you might wonder, "Can't I just plug in there and crank it up?" In general you usually can do just that, but there are some things you need to know to get a good result and to protect your amp from damage. Before we look at how different speaker combinations affect the impedance load your amp has to carry, we need to know what's going on.

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  • Do Fifteen-Inch Speakers Have More Low End Than Ten-inch Speakers?

    30 comments / Posted by Bruce Ohms

    10-inch Bass Speaker Cabinet

    Many bassists looking to get more bottom out of their bass rig have considered adding a bass cabinet with a bigger speaker, such as a 1x15 (or maybe even a 1x18)! Cabinets like these have a popular reputation for providing more low end than their smaller counterparts, such as 2x10, 4x10 and 2x12 cabinets. Similarly, it’s commonly perceived that smaller speakers have more high-end and a quicker response, so players looking for a more articulate sound may gravitate to a cabinet equipped with smaller speakers.

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  • How to Troubleshoot Your Guitar Rig in 30 Seconds

    4 comments / Posted by Bruce Ohms

    Guitar Player - How to Troubleshoot Your Guitar Rig

    The entertainment business has always been a “no-excuse” industry. Ever since the phrase “the show must go on!” was first coined in the 1800s by the circus industry, it has been repeated by stage managers everywhere. Whether you make your living playing music or you are a weekend warrior for fun, a good trouble shooting approach will let you go on with the show. Second chances are hard to get, so you need to make that first shot work. Make sure you’ve prepared not only your music but also make sure your equipment is reliable and well-maintained. Unfortunately there is no way to predict when a bad connection or worse a failure will develop in your guitar system, but it is likely at some point you will turn up your guitar on stage and find there is no sound coming out. The good news is that by following a few simple steps, any musician can learn to quickly find which part of the system isn’t working and bypass it to keep the music going.

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  • Advantages of a Building Modular Guitar Rig

    4 comments / Posted by Bruce Ohms

    Guitar Player with Guitar Rig

    Today’s gigging musician will play in a wide variety of venues: small bars, clubs, outdoor stages, and so much more! As such, it is important to have a rig that is suitable for a range of venues and performing situations. Conventional wisdom says it’s better to get way more amp than you need to make sure you have enough juice for any situation. You can always turn down, right? That usually is not true, because the tone and dynamics change on guitar amps when turned up or down. It is also financially wiser to purchase a rig for the long haul, with the power and tone that you won’t grow out of anytime soon. That’s in a perfect world at least- in the real world, if your band is playing the local bar circuit or going on your first tour, you are going to be responsible for moving your rig around and setting it up onstage, so having a huge, powerful rig isn’t always the best way to go. Having a modular rig is highly beneficial for players seeking the easiest setup and best sound at every gig, no matter where it may be!

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