October 29, 2015

Getting a big gig is always fun when you are playing in a band. Every gig is different and can require different things. You need to consider each type of show separately without grouping them all as the same. You cannot expect to act the same way at a corporate gig as you would playing a show for a club. When preparing for your gig, you want to consider the environment in determining how to approach it. Some shows may require that you turn them down. If you feel that the place of the show is constraining and requires you to act different than who you are, you want to politely refuse it rather than compromising yourself. Should you decide to accept the gig for a corporate show, there are some etiquette rules you need to consider.

Corporate Gig

Do Act Professionally

There is a major difference between playing a corporate show and playing in a bar. When you choose to play a corporate show, you will encounter a completely different environment. In a bar, people are not as conservative and are more laid back. For a corporate gig, you have a different type of audience and they have rules that they have to abide by. It is important that you come together as a band and lay down the rules of how everyone should act. Making sure everyone is on the same page can help you get a second gig with the company.

Do Communicate Effectively

Corporate gigs require a certain amount of communication that may be different than other gigs. You will likely have one person you will communicate with directly that is in charge of booking bands and other vendors. This person will likely be responsible for rebooking your band for future gigs if they like your performance and sound. It is important that you are respectful throughout communication with the representative of the company. In an effort to make sure the gig goes seamless, you should ask questions. If needed, take a tour of the facility ahead of time so you can get an idea of what type of gear you will need for the space. You also want to make yourselves available should the corporate representative need to ask you any questions.

Don’t Take it Lightly

When you get booked for a corporate gig, it is important that you show your best behavior. There will be people of all walks of life at this event and you never know who could decide to book you for their event. You want to make a great first impression so that it can possibly open up other opportunities for your band later down the road. When you go to perform your show, you want to treat it just as important as if you were performing for a big time record producer.

Don’t Get Sloppy

Preparation is the key to a successful gig. You want to make sure you are prepared for anything. Having a survival kit can help you overcome obstacles you may face. Should a mic quit working or the space is bigger than you thought, your survival kit should have plenty of extra equipment to ensure that the show goes on. 




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