November 04, 2015

Gigs are not easy to come by and when you do get the opportunity, you want to ensure it goes extremely well, as a good product is the best form of marketing. If you can impress the crowd, those people will talk about you and your chances of success will trend upwards. Here are a few tips to help you have a good show:

Promote

You got a gig all lined up, so now your advertising work has to gear up. It’s your responsibility to get the word out to help sell the show. Social media is a great way to start. Create your own Facebook page for the event, then tap into all your networks of family, friends and acquaintances and get the word out. Social media is great, but don’t sit back just yet.

Plan a Successful Gig

You still need to use some traditional methods to complement your internet activities. Get a graphic artist (you can find real great and inexpensive artists via online freelance work sites) to design a poster and flyers and put them up in all the right locations, like university and college campuses, restaurants and local stores. Contact your local press to get your show printed in show guides and previews. You need to work on your media strategy at least two to three months before the big date. These things take time and effort, so you have to work at it.

As you promote your show, always try to inform the venue of your efforts as they will love you for it. It will show them you are serious about your work and are driven. If you get reviewed online or someone is going to blog about your gig or put you on the radio, take a moment to inform venue management. They may put up links on their own website and the cross promotion will only enhance the buzz for your gig.

Band Practice makes perfect

A Cliché That Works

Practice makes perfect. It may be old wisdom, but you do know the other cliché that is (sometimes) right, ‘old is gold’. Wow, two clichés in one sentence will give anyone a brain cramp. I promise you no more for the rest of this article. Back to the matter at hand, you do need to practice. A lot. There cannot be any moments on the stage when you are unsure of what to do next nor have two band members with different ideas of the next song to play. I know this is extremely basic, but unfortunately it does happen occasionally.

Practice repeatedly until you can consistently play well. Practice in different settings, like under a strobe light (if you can get your hands on one), in the dark, while friends are watching. Perform standing, walking and while talking. The more scenarios you can practice in, the better you will be prepared for any unforeseen eventualities onstage. If you have a new song, practice it the most so that by the time you are onstage, it feels old to you, but is new for the crowd.

While practicing, it may not always be easy to judge your performance. Ask an experienced friend to give you some reviews, but ask someone who you know will not be afraid to tell you like it is and won’t sugar-coat any negatives. You can also record your practices on audio and video and view them later. When reviewing, mute the video recording and analyze your onstage presence, which we deal with below.

Your Stage Presence

Performing live means people are not just listening to you, but also watching your every move. You need to entertain your crowd and make your presence felt. If you are energized onstage, the crowd will feed off you and will enjoy your show. As stated earlier, watch videos of your rehearsals to see how you are behaving while playing your music.

Learn how to move during a live concert. You want to convey to the audience that you are enjoying yourself and get them excited. If you are a guitarist, set your strap at a snug length so you are free to move about while performing. As a drummer, you should learn to get your body into the movement of the songs, maybe even launch your sticks in the air to demonstrate your thrill at playing. But all of this has to feel natural to the audience, so practice it until it becomes second nature.

During the gig, engage people. Ask them how they are doing, tell them the name of the next song you will be playing, and why or where you wrote the song. A little communication with the audience will keep the show light-hearted and more enjoyable for everyone.

Performance Logistics

There are many things that can go wrong with logistics, so spend some time to prepare. Check all your contract obligations. You don’t want to show up at the venue surprised you have to pay an additional $500 to play. These things need to be ironed out before the big day. Have your entire equipment ready, along with any backups you think you will need. Decide how you will get to the location. Take into account traffic and plan to get there early.

Now get out there and put on the show that will get you (and your band) noticed!




Also in Audio Info & Education

Adjusting To Different Venues
Adjusting To Different Venues

February 26, 2021

It would be awesome if every show was exactly the same, with the exact same crowd, the exact same backline, the exact same setlist, the exact same…

Actually, no it wouldn’t. Live music would be pretty boring if it were always exactly the same. Luckily it turns out it’s not, and unless you’ve got a weekly gig at the same venue every week, you’ll find yourself in a variety of different venues with a wildly different set up, room, and audience from night to night.

Read More

Mid-Side Miking Technique
Mid-Side Miking Technique

February 23, 2021

For some, mid-side miking may be a new-fangled technique shrouded in mystery, but it’s nearly as old as recording itself, and as it turns out, not a difficult technique at all. Invented in 1933 by Alan Blumlein, mid-side technique is a stereo miking technique that can be used on just about anything from guitars to pianos to strings to vocal groups.

Read More

Re-Amping: What Why How
Re-Amping: What, Why, How

January 29, 2021

If you don’t already know what re-amping is, it’s simply the act of taking a signal out of your DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) and running it through a guitar amp and a cabinet, miking the cabinet up and recording the result. Carvin Audio’s V112E Guitar Extension Cab is a good choice for this. This technique is versatile, and you could include any number of processing units in the chain.

That covers the basic what of re-amping. Now let’s talk just a little bit about how and why you would do such a thing.

Read More